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Google Doodle celebrates 50th anniversary of Moon landing

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Fifty years ago, NASA's Apollo 11 mission changed our world and ideas of what is possible by successfully landing humans on the surface of the moon⁠-and bringing them home safely⁠-for the first time in history.

Todays google doodle

To mark the 50th anniversary this week of NASA's Apollo 11 mission, Google has come up with an animated video Doodle that will let you experience the journey to the moon and back.

During the four-and-a-half-minute video Doodle, which is gradually rolling out around the world, Collins walks you through key moments of the mission, starting with the Apollo 11 launch. Mike Collins' voice over that takes over from the drama of countdown and lift-off.

"It took 4,00,000 people to put the first man on Moon," says Collins as he explains how the Apollo 11 was made of 3 parts and how though the sight of the Moon was a delight.

"As impressive as the view of the alien Moon was, it was nothing compared to the sight of the Earth," he says.

He signs out saying: "Houston this is Mike Collins on Apollo 11, thank you so much for joining me today, Mike Collins out!"

On July 16, 1969, Apollo 11 was launched into space and on July 20, it landed the first two humans on the Moon Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module Eagle's pilot Buzz Aldrin.

Their spacecraft took four days to reach the Moon, before its lunar module, known as "Eagle," touched the lunar surface on July 20, 1969. Armstrong emerged a few hours later.

Collins remained in lunar orbit in the command module Columbia, their only means of returning back to Earth.

Along the way to the moon's surface, Armstrong and Aldrin lost radio contact with Earth, the onboard computer showed unfamiliar error codes, and fuel ran short. As millions watched on television with anxious anticipation, they successfully steered the module to a safe landing on the crater dubbed the "Sea of Tranquility" on July 20, 1969.

Not long after, Armstrong became the first human to step foot on the moon, stating the now infamous words "That's one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind."

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