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'Trump did not enjoy his own inauguration', reveals Michael Wolff's book

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    New York Magazine has published excerpts from 'Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House' which chronicled the first year of Trump's presidency, from the final days of the 2016 campaign to October of the following year. The book authored by Michael Wolff describes Trump and roles played his closest aides' in the White House.

    'Trump did not enjoy his own inauguration', reveals Fire and Fury book

    1. Trump didn't believe he would win the presidential election

    From the start, the leitmotif for Trump about his own campaign was how crappy it was, and how everybody involved in it was a loser. In August, when he was trailing Hillary Clinton by more than 12 points, he couldn't conjure even a far-fetched scenario for achieving an electoral victory. He was baffled when the right-wing billionaire Robert Mercer, a Ted Cruz backer whom Trump barely knew, offered him an infusion of $5 million. When Mercer and his daughter Rebekah presented their plan to take over the campaign and install their lieutenants, Steve Bannon and Conway, Trump didn't resist. He only expressed vast incomprehension about why anyone would want to do that. "This thing," he told the Mercers, "is so fucked up."

    2. Trump did not enjoy his own inauguration

    He was angry that A-level stars had snubbed the event, disgruntled with the accommodations at Blair House, and visibly fighting with his wife, who seemed on the verge of tears. Throughout the day, he wore what some around him had taken to calling his golf face: angry and pissed off, shoulders hunched, arms swinging, brow furled, lips pursed.

    3. Trump assembled a list of more than 200 executive orders to issue in the first 100 days

    He had quietly assembled a list of more than 200 executive orders to issue in the first 100 days. The very first EO, in his view, had to be a crackdown on immigration. After all, it was one of Trump's core campaign promises. Plus, Steve Bannon (his campaign strategist) knew, it was an issue that made liberals batshit mad. On Friday, January 27 - only his eighth day in office - Trump signed an executive order issuing a sweeping exclusion of many Muslims from the United States. In his mania to seize the day, with almost no one in the federal government has seen it or even been aware of it, Bannon had succeeded in pushing through an executive order that overhauled U.S. immigration policy while bypassing the very agencies and personnel responsible for enforcing it.

    4. Trump reprimanded the housekeeping staff for picking up his shirt from the floor

    In the first days, he ordered two television screens in addition to the one already there, and a lock on the door, precipitating a brief standoff with the Secret Service, who insisted they have access to the room. He ­reprimanded the housekeeping staff for picking up his shirt from the floor: "If my shirt is on the floor, it's because I want it on the floor." Then he imposed a set of new rules: Nobody touch anything, especially not his toothbrush. (He had a longtime fear of being poisoned, one reason why he liked to eat at McDonald's - nobody knew he was coming and the food was safely premade.) Also, he would let housekeeping know when he wanted his sheets done, and he would strip his own bed.

    5. Trump was in bed by that time with a cheeseburger

    If he was not having his 6:30 dinner with Steve Bannon, then, more to his liking, he was in bed by that time with a cheeseburger, watching his three screens and making phone calls - the phone was his true contact point with the world - to a small group of friends, who charted his rising and falling levels of agitation through the evening and then compared notes with one another.

    6. Competition for chief of staff at the White House

    Without a strong chief of staff at the White House, there was no real up-and-down structure in the administration - merely a figure at the top and everyone else scrambling for his attention. It wasn't task-based so much as response-oriented - whatever captured the boss's attention focused everybody's attention. Reinhold Priebus and Steve Bannon and Jared Kushner, son-in-law of Trump were all fighting to be the power of the Trump throne. And in these crosshairs was Katie Walsh, the deputy chief of staff.

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