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10 Facts About Eclipses

Some of the Interesting Facts about Eclipses
ECLIPSE SEASONS

An eclipse season is one of only two periods during each year when the Sun, the Moon and Earth are aligned and eclipses can occur. Each season lasts about 35 days and repeats just short of six months later!
A ROUND EARTH

 Lunar eclipses probably taught people that Earth is round when they saw Earth’s shadow on the Moon.
SAFETY FIRST

Never look at a solar eclipse without proper safety methods — except for the brief period, known as totality, when the Moon is completely blocking the Sun. Looking at the Sun can damage your eyes!
SCIENTISTS AT WORK

The corona ­– the Sun’s outer atmosphere – normally can’t be seen because of the bright solar surface, but during a total solar eclipse, the corona emerges, offering unique science opportunities.
DIFFERENT TYPES

There are four types of solar eclipses (partial, total, hybrid, and annular) and three types of lunar eclipses (total, penumbral, and partial).
A RED MOON

A lunar eclipse occurs when Earth passes between the Moon and the Sun, casting the Moon in its shadow. This causes the Moon to appear red, since Earth’s atmosphere filters out blue light coming from the Sun.
A LASTING EXPERIENCE

While lunar eclipses can last for a few hours, solar eclipses only last for a few minutes.
20 YEARS LATER

 After the total solar eclipse on April 8, 2024, the next total solar eclipse that can be seen from the continental United States will be on August 23, 2044.
ANIMAL KINGDOM

When a solar eclipse reaches totality, nocturnal wildlife sometimes wakes up, thinking that it’s nighttime, and non-nocturnal wildlife might think it’s time to head to sleep!
A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE

 If you were standing on the Moon during a lunar eclipse, it’s the Earth that would be dark, because the Sun would be behind it!