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9/11: Don’t miss these NASA images shot after the attacks

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    New York, Sep 12: Seventeen years after 9/11 terror attacks, NASA recalled the anniversary of the tragic terror attacks with new photos of New York City and Washington taken from space.

    NASA astronaut remembers photo taken from space of 9/11 terror attacks

    NASA posted the photograph to its website with Commander Culbertson sending a message of support to the victims and their families.

    "Today, we remember the victims, survivors and heroes of #September11th," NASA tweeted, along with a new photo of New York City captured by NASA astronaut Ricky Arnold at the International Space Station on June 19.

    What happened 17 years ago

    What happened 17 years ago

    This week marks 17 years since four commercial planes were hijacked in the US, with two being flown into New York's World Trade Centre, one into the Pentagon in Washington DC and one crashing in a field in Pennsylvania, killing a total of nearly 3000 people and injuring more than 6000 others.

    NASA remembers September 11th

    NASA remembers September 11th

    US space agency NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) released some pictures last year that were taken a few hours after the attacks. It was NASA's way of recalling the unfateful day. US astronaut Frank Culbertson was aboard the International Space Station, which coincidentally, happened to fly over the New York City area moments after the Twin Towers came down. (Pic Courtesy: NASA)

    New York City as seen from the International Space Station in August 2014

    New York City as seen from the International Space Station in August 2014

    New York City as seen from the International Space Station in August 2014. The International Space Station moved along its path and lost view of the New York City, however other satellites of NASA including Terra satellite caught images of the attack's immediate aftermath. The dreadful incident of the 9/11 attacks can never be forgotten that killed around 3000 people and injured over 6000 people.

    After two planes crashed into towers of World Trade Center

    After two planes crashed into towers of World Trade Center

    Visible from space, a smoke plume rises from the Manhattan area after two planes crashed into the towers of the World Trade Center. This photo was taken of metropolitan New York City (and other parts of New York as well as New Jersey) the morning of September 11, 2001.

    Tragedy in New York City

    Tragedy in New York City

    This image from NASA's Terra satellite shows a large plume of smoke streaming southward from the remnants of the burning World Trade Towers in downtown Manhattan yesterday (September 11, 2001). The image was acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) within a few hours after the terrorist attack. The red pixels in this scene show the location of vegetation. Light blue-white pixels show where there are concrete surfaces.

    Aftermath of World Trade Center attack

    Aftermath of World Trade Center attack

    This true-color image was taken by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) aboard the Landsat 7 satellite on September 12, 2001, at roughly 11:30 a.m. Eastern Daylight Savings Time. Smoke can still be seen at the site.

    September 11, the dreadful and unfateful incident attacking the World Trade Center, took place in the city of New York.

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