Dropping Chanderpaul: West Indies can't follow Australia-like policy if they don't have the system

The West Indies were routed by Australia in a Test series, yet again. The Caribbeans have now lost 9 of the last 10 series against the Aussies and Sir Frank Worrell is an Australian citizen since 1992-93 when the West Indies had last won the trophy. Not many are sure if Sir Worrell will ever make a comeback in the West Indies the near future.

Australia trounce Windies by 277 runs in Second Test, win series 2-0; Scorecard

But shouldn't the West Indian cricket authorities feel ashamed of the fact? The Australia of today is not as formidable as they were even a few years ago under Ricky Ponting. But yet, the results of the latest two Test matches proved that the Caribbeans are not bothered about the opponents' power. They are, anyway, destined to lose.


What makes the two losses (by 9 wickets and 277 runs, respectively) even worse is the decision to drop Shivnarine Chanderpaul, a veteran of 164 Tests, the most numbers played by any cricketer from the Caribbeans. [Chanderpaul's exclusion upsets Brian Lara]

Why do you exclude Chanderpaul from a team that can't make 250 in four attempts?

It was said that the southpaw, who struggled in his last few series, was no more fit to play a Test match. But did his replacements either? The West Indies couldn't get to 250 in the four innings that they played against Australia in the just-concluded home series.

Was Chanderpaul dropped because selectors didn't want him break lara's record?

The Australia-like thinking behind dropping Chanderpaul didn't pay off for the West Indies because the Caribbeans don't have an Australia-like cricketing system in place. If you don't have an infrastructure, you just can't afford to take ambitious calls.

West Indies are yet to find a replacement for Desmond Haynes

Chanderpaul's experience is not the same first. Two decades ago, opener Desmond Haynes was dropped even when he was in a good form (he is just one of the two players in international cricket to have hit centuries in his debut and final one-day international matches) and the West Indies had struggled without the legendary opener in a series against the same Australians in a home series.

The selectors were also looking for an apt replacement but the Caribbeans are yet to discover a replacement for the iconic Greenidge-Haynes opening partnership.

The West Indies still had players of repute to fall back on after Haynes's departure. The likes of Brian Lara, Richie Richardson, Carl Hooper and still a decent bowling line-up made the West Indies a team to cheer for, if they were not invincibles any more.

But now, they are just a bunch of also-ran who display some individual brilliance here and there bit never clicks as a unit. The talent is definitely there but their brilliance is seen more during the Indian Premier League matches rather than for the West Indies.

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