Will Brexit make UK's security vulnerable?

London, June 22: If the United Kingdom (UK) really leaves the European Union, what will be the ramifications for its security? This could be another big question doing the rounds, besides those on the possible consequences for the country's currency and economy and immigration laws. [What is Brexit and why is it important?]

The UK, barring the brutal murder of one of its Labour lawmakers Jo Cox just days ahead of the referendum, has not seen any attack by the radical Islamists, something France has seen in recent times. Neither has it seen anything horrendous like the mass shooting in a gay nightclub in Orlando in the US which saw death of 49 people. [Could Brexit see a Domino effect in Europe?]


But what if the UK had witnessed a similar mass execution in the run up to the key referendum? [Will India gain or lose from Brexit?]

Both the pro- and anti-exit camps have made security a key issue of their respective logic. The pro-exit camp says if the UK controls the immigration, the threat of radical Islam will be reduced. The anti-exit camp says on the other hand that EU acts as a warning against terrorists, an outer defence, and hence gives the UK a chance to prepare itself.

The anti-exit voices feel the coordination that takes place within the EU goes to a big extent to serve the security interests of the UK, like through sharing of data and other information. There are also voices that feel that those procedures would continue and that the Interpol's database is larger than that of the Europol's. Hence, the arguments and counter-arguments stand close with none of the two sides gaining any decisive lead.

The UK's security concerns also don't end with terrorism. Its Prime Minister David Cameron, who is an anti-exit man, recently apprehended that Brexit could see war breaking out across Europe, something which has often taken place in the past. Cameron, though, was accused of using fear tactics ahead of the referendum but his concerns reflected some of the great leaders of the past as well.

The stakes in the security debate are too high and the camp which would win this debate could win the referendum as well.

Please Wait while comments are loading...