Dented, but not scared: The Gay community in US becomes vocal

Orlando, June 13: It is perhaps a coincidence that the Gay pride parade in US was just on the day of the Orlando gay club shootings that happened in the week hours of Sunday. In a symbolical gesture of solidarity, the ones who suffered the loss of near and dear ones in the Pulse Club, made it a point to join the parade.

The club is considered a meeting point of ideas and feelings, which are otherwise judged by the world outside and an attack on the club was an attack on the rights of the LGBT community here.

Orlando shooting

However, confusion still belies as to why 29 year old Omar Mateen opened fire on the 300 strong crowd, killing 50 people and fatally injuring 52 others. Meanwhile the killer's father said that his father had become angry when he saw one man kissing another man.

[Read: Orlando shooting: Facebook activates Safety Check feature ]

Calling the killings as violation of gay rights, President Barack obama said that US is still wehere it was, even after a long string of hard-fought legal successes, including the SC's ruling just a year ago that all 50 states should be allowed same-sex marriages.

One of the gay rights activists said, "An incident like this brings the hatred that does exist out there to the forefront. It is a reminder of what we have to do to spread love, not hate."

[Read: Why Orlando shooting was deadliest in US history]

Another woman said, "There is risk in this life and we're not going to let hate win. We've got to be amongst the family today. Everybody is suffering. I think we all kind of want to be together today."

Meanwhile, in Orlando leaders of groups that service the LGBT residents said that they would amass money for the victims of the shooting and raised $430,000 within hours.

[Read: UN chief, British PM slam Orlando mass shooting ]

"We will love and support the victims even as we join to eradicate the hatred that lies at the core of this violence," said Mary Meeks, a prominent Florida civil rights lawyer.As people placed flowers at the Stone Wall, President Barack Obama said, ""The place where they were attacked is more than a nightclub," he said. "It is a place of solidarity and empowerment where people have come together to raise awareness, to speak their minds, and to advocate for their civil rights."

OneIndia News

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