Why the Chhota Rajan surrender theory needs to be debunked

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New Delhi, Oct 29: If Chhota Rajan wanted to surrender, he would have done so at Australia and not in Indonesia.

Sources in the Mumbai police crime branch, who are currently in the process of translating the case papers relating to Chhota Rajan to Balinese, said that the theory of him surrendering is not at all correct.

Chhota Rajan

Mumbai police officials also said that there was no special operation leading up to the arrest of Rajan and he was detained while trying to escape as there was a red corner alert against him.

Why the surrender theory does not add up:

Amidst reports that Rajan had engineered his surrender, one needs to bear in mind that had he wanted to do so, he would have done it in Australia.

Rajan himself has indicated that he wanted to return to India. It is, however, unclear whether he was planning to fly into India from Indonesia had he not been caught.

Rajan is aware that India does not have an extradition treaty with Indonesia.

If he had surrendered in Australia he would have been easily extradited to India. India and Australia signed an extradition treaty in 2011.

Indonesia on the other hand does not have an extradition treaty with India and neither does it figure in the list of nations with which an extradition arrangement can be worked out.

However, the want of such a pact will not come in the way of Indonesia sending Rajan over to India. Once the case papers against him are submitted, he can be deported by Indonesia to India.

While India are confident of bringing Rajan back, they are yet to find out what conditions would be set before he is sent out.

When Abu Salem was sent to India from Portugal, there was a pre-condition that he shall not be handed out a death sentence.

For the CBI and the Mumbai police the primary concern for now is submitting the case papers.

There are several papers relating to Rajan and India will now have to convince Indonesia that he is wanted for several crimes in India.

The case papers are being translated to Balinese as is the requirement in Indonesia.

OneIndia News

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