Why Bernie Sanders is a winner even after losing

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A lot depends on Bernie Sanders now if Hillary Clinton has to nail the Presidential elections this year. Sanders may be tailing behind Hillary Clinton, but he has announced that he would fight till the end of the Democratic National convention in Philadelphia in late July.

Clinton by then would have won a majority of pledged delegates, but not an absolute majority of overall delegates. This means that if Sanders can persuade a huge number of superdelegates to back him, he could become the nominee.

Bernie Sanders

Call it blessing in disguise, but Bernie is already a winner even if he lost.

In a press meeting, Sanders once said, "She has received obviously a whole lot of superdelegate support, no question about that. A lot more than I have. But superdelegates don't vote until they're on the floor of the Democratic convention. That's when they vote."

Could be a strategy well played

Bernie Sanders met Obama yesterday in the White House and he was also quoted as saying that he would stop Trump from winning anyhow. So does that mean that he will draw his supporters till the convention and then withdraw, convincing that Hillary is the best option they have? However unlikely, this still remains a possibility.

[Read: US Presidential elections: Why California is important for the Democrats? ]

Bernie travelled a long way to the Senate

Right from being an independent candidate to winning the tough third-party campaign to be elected mayor of Burlington. In 1988, Sanders later won a seat in the US House of Representatives.

But once in Congress, Sanders settled into a comfort zone when the party stopped running candidates against him even when they differed in ideologies. In 2006, when a Senate seat opened up in Vermont, the party's national leaders - everyone from Nancy Pelosi to Chuck Schumer - cleared the field for him so he could win the Democratic nomination unopposed. Having won it, he then officially declined it in order to run as an independent in a race with no Democratic nominee.

[Read: Sanders vows to prevent Trump being elected US President ]

He then entered the Senate and joined the party Caucus and now serves as the ranking member of the Budget Committee. Now, if the Democrats win the Senate this NOvember, he will either be chief of that committee or the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee. If Clinton wins in November, he'll have influence over executive branch appointments and a good chance to chair an important committee and shape legislation.

For the time being, there is no other way but to pin hopes on Sanders...for good.

[Read: Sanders not surprised by Obama endorsing Clinton: WH ]

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