Turkey faces hung future after election

On June 7 Turkey faced most stressful election in recent time. People did not only vote to choose their representatives, but also to decide the future of the country. Record 86 percent turnout was reported in the election held on Sunday. A 3 percent of more voters participated this year, compared with 83.16% in the 2011 general elections.

In the general election held in 2011, the AKP bagged 327 seats with a 49.83% share of the vote, while the CHP got 135 seats with 25.98% and the MHP won 53 seats with 13.01%. The HDP did not exist at the time, and 35 pro-Kurdish independents were elected.

Hung parliament in Turkey

The Turkey election results are in: The ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) has lost its parliamentary majority and the pro-Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party (HDP) has passed the undemocratic 10% threshold with a 13.1% share of the vote.

The distribution of seats in the new Turkish parliament is as follows:
258 seats for the Islamist AKP (40.9%)
132 seats for the main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) (25%)
80 seats for the Turkish Nationalist Action Party (MHP) (16.3%)
80 seats for the pro-Kurdish HDP (13.1%)

Read More: Turkey votes in parliamentary polls

Turkey is facing uncertainty as the picture is not clear about formation of government whether it would be a minority government, a coalition government, the possibility of more elections. The election results has created ambiguity in political fraternity in Turkey.

Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has said the inconclusive election result means no party can govern alone.
Erdogan who became the first directly elected president of Turkey, was looking for 330 seats to carry out referendum to shift power from the Prime Minister's Office to the president. The election result has dashed his hope of doing this.

The AKP, according to some analysts, could also call for early parliamentary elections, which would once again raise the potential for more political turmoil and economic instability.

(With inputs from almonitor, CNN)

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