Things to know about unforgettable 1971 Bangladesh war crimes

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Bangladesh war crimes the unforgettable tales of many can give goosebumps once you read them carefully. Crimes committed by Pakistani army with the help of some local supporters were similar what is ISIS is committing in these days. Mass murders, mass rape, sex slaves all crimes were committed by the soldiers of Pakistani army during the war crime. Pakistan army indiscriminately opened fire on people awaiting to cross the border.

Authorities in Bangladeshi claim that 3 million people were killed during the war crimes, while the Hamoodur Rahman Commission, an official Pakistan Government investigation, put the figure as low as 26,000 civilian casualties.
The fact is that the number of dead in Bangladesh in 1971 was almost certainly well into seven figures. It was one of the worst genocides of the World War II era, outstripping Rwanda (800,000 killed) and probably surpassing even Indonesia (1 million to 1.5 million killed in 1965-66).

Bangladesh war crimes explained

Below are the things to know about War crimes

  • War crimes in Bangladesh took place in 1971 resulted in the secession of East Pakistan later in December, 1971.
  • On March 25 the genocide was started with the launch of Operation Searchlight by Pakistan army. 
  • The university in Dhaka was attacked and students exterminated in their hundreds.
  • Death squads roamed the streets of Dhaka, killing some 7,000 people in a single night.
  • Thousands of people were killed and women were raped during the nine month long Bangladesh war of independence.
  • Younger men and adolescent boys, of whatever social class, were equally targets.
  • The Guinness Book of Records lists the Bangladesh Genocide as one of the top 5 genocides in the 20th century.
  • During the war, Pakistan Army and its local collaborators, mainly Jamaat e Islami carried out a systematic execution of the leading Bengali intellectuals.
  • The war crimes officially ended on December 16, 1971.

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