Osama Bin Laden de-classified: He died an unhappy man

Osama Bin Laden knew that the dark days for the al Qaeda were round the corner.  

"There was lack of support for him from the Muslims and the charm was fading away," a letter written by Osama Bin Laden had revealed.

The reading of the declassified documents relating to Osama Bin Laden by the prosecutors during the trial of Abid Nasir suggests that Bin Laden was a disgruntled man at the time of his death. Naisr who headed the al Qaeda cell in Britain is standing trial in connection with a terror plot.


While some of the de-classified documents point to planning of attacks both in Britain and Russia, a lot of material recovered from Abottabad where Laden was killed show how the leader of the al Qaeda was fading out within the organization.

Dark days for the al Qaeda

While many would say that the fall of the al Qaeda began after the death of Bin Laden, the material recovered which includes letters written by him suggest that the dark days for the al Qaeda had already begun.

Bin Laden had written that the al Qaeda has become dysfunctional and the trust among the Muslims for the organization had begun to crumble. Laden had pointed out that he wished to carry out many more attacks against the West, but due to lack of trust by the Muslims and bickering within the al Qaeda none of this was possible.

Bin Laden said that apart from the bickering within the al Qaeda there was also a lot of problem with their allies. He said that correctional measures need to be taken soon and the trust needs to be reinstated by Jihadis across the world for the organization to flourish.

Osama felt the need for more credit

Osama Bin Laden in one of the notes also vents his anger of the focus from the al Qaeda diverting. He firmly believed that America plunged into economic crisis post 9/11 because of the al Qaeda.

He felt that the al Qaeda had not done enough to propagate this through their media wings. He had written that the Americans had shifted their focus to the weak economy in the year 2010. This ought to have been credited to the al Qaeda he felt.

He stated that the weak economy was a result of the al Qaeda conducted terrorist attacks and they ought to have been given credit for this.

Laden had stopped trusting his own people

The letters that he had written in the year 2010 indicate that he was utterly bitter and had even stopped trusting several persons within his own network. He was unhappy with the al Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula. He felt that the leader of the AQAP was attempting to take over Yemen and establish an Islamic State.

According to Laden the primary agenda for the al Qaeda across the world ought to have been attacking America and there should be no shift in focus. He was also unhappy with the Al-Shabab based out of Somalia. He felt that they could not govern and their kind of implementation of the Sharia law where chopping of hands had become a routine will result in a trust deficit.

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