US vice presidents who visited India

In the 21st century, Indo-US relations have come a long way. Now, the two powerful nations are sharing positive bilateral ties in terms of economy, trade, defence and a number of key issues.

While the visits by the presidents and other high-level dignitaries (from both the US and India) have always played an essential part in boosting up the ties of two countries, we take a look at the previous vice presidents who have visited India.

Although, the list isn't a long one, only Hubert Humphrey and George HW Bush took a tour to India, before Joe Biden.

Prezs who have visited India

Hubert Horatio Humphrey, a Democrat from Minnesota, was the first US vice president, who visited India in 1966 to attend the funeral of prime minister Lal Bahadur Shastri, the same year when Indira Gandhi became prime minister.

He was US' 38th vice president serving under President Lyndon B. Johnson from 1965 to 1969.

His brief visit took place more out of diplomatic protocol and hit international news headlines as he was close with the then Soviet Union Premier Alexei Kosygin who was also present at the funeral.

At that time, Johnson described Shastri's death as "a grievous blow to the hopes of mankind for peace and progress."

In 1984, George Herbert Walker Bush, from Texas, the 41st President of the United States (1989-1993), who, also served as the 43rd Vice President of the United States (1981-1989) visited India in 1984 under the president-ship of Ronald Reagan.

Bush, 89, is the oldest surviving former President and Vice President, who is a veteran of World War II is often referred to as "George H. W. Bush", "Bush 41", "Bush the Elder", and "George Bush, Sr." to distinguish from his son, former President George W. Bush.

Neither of the two visits did any help in enhancing the bilateral relationship of the two countries.

The incumbent 47th Vice President Joe Biden is currently, on a four-day visit to India, accompanied by his wife, Jill. This is Biden's second trip to India, earlier, he visited in 2008 as a Senator.

Last month, External Affairs Minister Salman Khurshid wrote in an opinion piece in the New York Times, "From estranged democracies to engaged democracies, it has been a long and fascinating journey for India and the United States."

Underlining that India and the world have changed dramatically in the past two decades, the minister said, "it has also given birth to great expectations. The management and fulfillment of those expectations is crucial for the dialogue and partnership between the two countries."

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