NASA finds 30-yr-old 'youngest' nearby black hole

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Washington, Nov 18 (ANI): NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered evidence of the youngest black hole known to exist in our cosmic neighbourhood.

The 30-year-old black hole could help scientists better understand how massive stars explode, which ones leave behind black holes or neutron stars, and the number of black holes in our galaxy and others.

It is a remnant of SN 1979C, a supernova in the galaxy M100 approximately 50 million light-years from Earth; scientists believe SN 1979C, first discovered by an amateur astronomer in 1979, formed when a star about 20 times more massive than the Sun collapsed.

Data from Chandra, NASA's Swift satellite, the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady during observation from 1995 to 2007. This suggests the object is a black hole being fed either by material falling into it from the supernova or a binary companion.

The idea of a black hole with an observed age of only about 30 years is consistent with recent theoretical work. In 2005, a theory was presented that the bright optical light of this supernova was powered by a jet from a black hole that was unable to penetrate the hydrogen envelope of the star to form a GRB.The results seen in the observations of SN 1979C fit this theory very well.

"This is potentially a very important result. Seeing a black hole being born is exciting in its own right, but it also informs our models of how massive stars die and make supernovae. How did the implosion of the inner five solar masses of a massive star to a black hole create an explosion of the rest of the star and an extremely brilliant display, i.e. SN 1979C? Is the observed X-ray emission truly a unique signature of a black hole? We can expect to hear a lot more from the theorists on this one", said Professor Stanley Woosley, Editor of the journal New Astronomy.

Another intriguing possibility is that a young, rapidly spinning neutron star with a powerful wind of high-energy particles could be responsible for the X-ray emission. This would make the object in SN 1979C the youngest and brightest example of such a "pulsar wind nebula" and the youngest known neutron star.

The results appear in the New Astronomy journal. (ANI)

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