Bile may harbour human Fountain Of Youth

 
Share this on your social network:
   Facebook Twitter Google+    Comments Mail

Washington, Sept 16 (ANI): A new research from Concordia University has put the human quest for longer life one step closer.

The new study is the first to identify the role of a bile acid, called lithocholic acid (LCA), in extending the lifespan of normally aging yeast.

The findings may have significant implications for human longevity and health, as yeast share some common elements with people.

"Although we found that LCA greatly extends yeast longevity, yeast do not synthesize this or any other bile acid found in mammals," says senior author Vladimir Titorenko, Concordia University Research Chair in Genomics, Cell Biology and Aging and a professor in the Department of Biology.

"It may be that yeast have evolved to sense bile acids as mildly toxic molecules and respond by undergoing life-extending changes. It is conceivable that the life-extending potential of LCA may be relevant to humans as well."

Titorenko and colleagues screened more than 19 000 small molecules to test their ability to extend yeast-lifespan. Under both normal and stressed conditions, LCA had a major impact.

"Our findings imply that LCA extends longevity by targeting two different mechanisms," says first author Alexander Goldberg, a Concordia doctoral student.

"The first takes place regardless of the number of calories and involves the day-to-day or housekeeping proteins. The second system occurs during calorie-restriction and involves stressor proteins. Regardless of their triggers both of these mechanisms work to suppress the pro-aging process," he continues.

Titorenko says: "Although we have an overall idea how LCA works to extend longevity in yeast, we still need to determine if this is the case for other species. We do know from previous studies, however, that bile acids are beneficial to health and longevity. For example, they have shown to accumulate in the serum of long living mice and play a role in improving rodent liver and pancreatic function."

"This leads us to believe that bile acids have potential as pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of diabetes, obesity and various metabolic disorders, all of which are age-related. They may indeed offer hope for a healthy aging life," Titorenko adds.

The study has been published in the journal Aging. (ANI)

Write a Comment

Videos

OTHERS SPORTS ARE ALSO COMING UP IN COUNTRY SAYS BIPASHA BASU

OTHERS SPORTS ARE ALSO COMING UP IN COUNTRY SAYS BIPASHA BASU