Corporate Social Responsibility evolved in the early 20th century

Washington, Aug 24 (ANI): Although the term was not coined until 1953, new research shows that corporate social responsibility (CSR) have reportedly traces its roots to the early years of the 20th century and to the editor of one of America's initial business magazines, The World's Work.

"From its beginnings in November 1900, The World's Work was devoted to social responsibility in the public interest," David L. Remund, a Legacy Scholar in the Arthur W. Page Center for Integrity in Public Communication at Penn State University, was quoted as saying.

Remund's research paper, "The World's Work: Arthur W. Page and the Movement Toward Social Responsibility in Corporate Communications, 1913-1927," traces how Page's editorial vision reflected progress toward social responsibility in later corporate communications.

Page was the first to serve on the executive management team of a major corporation, AT and T. In 1927, he took his editorial views to AT and T and put them into action, laying the groundwork for the modern CSR model, the study suggested.

Historians of corporate social responsibility generally agree that the concept emerged in the 1930s and 1940s. It became formalized in 1953 with the publication of Social Responsibilities of the Businessman, a book by Howard Bowen.

However, Remund's study shows advocacy for CSR, in form if not name, from a major pro-business magazine much earlier than that. Further, he concludes that through Arthur W. Page, the supportive words of The World's Work became deeds when Page moved from the editor's chair into the corporate executive office.

The outcome of the research is a result of nearly 180 issues of The World's Work being examined by Remund. Page's personal correspondence, speeches and transcripts of oral interviews also were used.

"Five themes of corporate and social responsibility emerged. They include environmental protection, labour rights, consumer protection and education, child welfare and corporate transparency," Remund added.

He further wrote in his thesis "The editorials from Page's years with The World's Work indicate that what is now known as corporate social responsibility was a concern of the man who in 1927 became vice president of AT and T." (ANI)

Please Wait while comments are loading...