'Two for one' breast boosting technique not as viable as it seems

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London, Sep 16 (ANI): A technology that was claimed as the ultimate solution to give a boost to women's breasts by using fat removed from thighs is not viable as it seems, say experts.

Mel Graham, chairman of the Harley Medical Group, recently claimed that the "two for one" procedure could extract excess fat from where it was not wanted - the belly, hips or thighs - and relocate it to the bust.

However, rival cosmetic surgeons criticised the "hype" surrounding the new operation, insisting that it was "premature".

"(This) is setting consumers up for disappointment and there are many reasons for vigilance," the Independent quoted Dai Davies, of Plastic Surgery Partners in Harley Street, as saying.

He said that doctors have long been experimenting with innumerable aids to give women larger busts, including using body fat as a procedure.

The technique of removing fat by liposuction, and then injecting it into the chest has been tried for almost 20 years but with limited success, said Davies.

"Where you are injecting small amounts of fat into the face, which has a good blood supply, there is good evidence that it works. Most plastic surgeons would agree there is a place for it. But this involves injecting a large blob of fat into the breast area. Fat consists of living cells and living cells must have a blood supply, otherwise they die," he explained.

In a Japanese study last year, 230 women underwent fat transfer, and it was found that, on average, half the fat injected was lost and all the women needed a second procedure after a year.

There are also fears that dying fat cells could cause micro-calcification in the breast leading to difficulties in breast screening and an increase in biopsies - an invasive procedure to remove tissue to check for cancer.

"I don't think we should be a testing ground for all these techniques. You are feeding on a susceptible group of people. There should be controls but, sadly, the Government has decided it won't implement regulation," said Davies.

Professor David Sharpe, a plastic surgeon in Yorkshire and the founding chairman of the breast special interest group of BAAPS, said: "This sounds like another example of creative marketing. Breast implants are a well-tried and tested method. At the moment, I would stick with that."

Mel Braham, chairman of the Harley Medical Group, said results of a US trial to be presented next month would demonstrate the success of the operation.

"The results will be assessed by our medical board and, if approved, the operation will be introduced next year. I don't take risks with patients. I am confident this is a safe procedure," he said. (ANI)

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