Violence against Bangladesh mothers takes a toll on young children's health

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Washington, Aug 4 (ANI): Nearly 50 percent of mothers of young children in Bangladesh suffer violence at the hands of their husbands, which, in turn, increases the risk of respiratory infections and diarrhoea in their kids, according to a study.

The study underlined that despite substantial improvements in childhood survival in the previous decade, 77 per 1,000 children born in Bangladesh die before age 5, mainly due to diarrhoea and acute respiratory infections.

"Violence against mothers by their husbands is a factor hypothesized to relate directly and indirectly to the poor health of young children via exposure to violence, the incapacitation of mothers and direct mistreatment and neglect of children," wrote the authors.

For the study, Dr. Jay G. Silverman, of the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, and colleagues studied 1,592 married Bangladeshi women with at least one child age 5 years or younger who participated in the 2004 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey.

Intimate partner violence was assessed on surveys given to the men, whereas women reported information about their children's health.

More than two of every five (42.4 percent) of the mothers had experienced intimate partner violence from their husband within the past year.

Those who did were more likely to report that their children had acute respiratory infections (19.2 percent vs. 13.7 percent) or diarrhoea (11.6 percent vs. 7.6 percent) within the past two weeks.

"Importantly, because the present analyses were adjusted for potential confounders, these effects persist after consideration of socioeconomic status (e.g., poverty), household characteristics and environmental factors (e.g., sanitation)," wrote the authors.

The researchers noted that both direct and indirect mechanisms might be responsible for the elevated risk of illness among children exposed to intimate partner violence.

Trauma and anxiety are more common among children in violent households and could lead to suppression of the immune system over time.

In addition, the children could be experiencing direct physical harm from their fathers.

"A growing body of work demonstrates that intimate partner violence occurs within a context of male-partner control, which can include interference in the ability of women to meet basic health needs for themselves and their children," wrote the authors.

For example, women who are being abused may be less likely to have their children immunized or to breastfeed, both of which can compromise child health.

"Associations of maternal experiences of intimate partner violence with two leading causes of childhood mortality strongly suggest that such abuse threatens not only the health of women but also that of their children. Prevention of intimate partner violence perpetration by men may be critical to the improvement of maternal and child health," concluded the authors.

The study has been published in Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. (ANI)

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