Clear sky visibility over land has decreased globally over past 30 years

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Washington, March 13 (ANI): A new research has shown that as a result of increases in aerosols, or airborne pollution, clear sky visibility over land has decreased globally over the past 30 years, turning gray skies to blue.

The research, by a University of Maryland-led team, has compiled the first decades-long database of aerosol measurements over land, making possible new research into how air pollution changes affect climate change.

"Creation of this database is a big step forward for researching long-term changes in air pollution and correlating these with climate change," said Kaicun Wang, assistant research scientist in the University of Maryland's department of geography and lead author of the research paper.

"And it is the first time we have gotten global long-term aerosol information over land to go with information already available on aerosol measurements over the world's oceans," he added.

Wang, together with Shunlin Liang, a University of Maryland professor of geography, and Robert Dickinson, a professor of geological science at the University of Texas, Austin, created a database that includes visibility measurements taken from 1973 - 2007 at 3,250 meteorological stations all over the world and released by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC).

Visibility was the distance a meteorological observer could see clearly from the measurement source.

The more aerosols present in the air, the shorter the visibility distance.

According to the researchers, the visibility data were compared to available satellite data (2000-2007), and found to be comparable as an indicator of aerosol concentration in the air.

Thus, they conclude, the visibility data provide a valid source from which scientists can study correlations between air pollution and climate change.

Studies of the long-term effects of aerosols on climate change have been largely inconclusive up to now due to limited over-land aerosol measurements, according to Wang and his team.

However, with this database, researchers can now compare temperature, rainfall and cloud cover data from the past 35 years with the aerosol measurements in the new database.

According to the authors, a preliminary analysis of the database measurements shows a steady increase in aerosols over the period from 1973 to 2007.

Increased aerosols in the atmosphere block solar radiation from the earth's surface, and have thus caused a net "global dimming."

The only region that does not show an increase in aerosols is Europe, which has actually experienced a "global brightening."

The largest known source of increased aerosols is increased burning of fossil fuels. And a major product of fossil fuel combustion is sulfur dioxide.

Thus, the team notes, that their finding of a steady increase in aerosols in recent decades, also suggests an increase in sulfate aerosols. (ANI)

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