World still safe after Big-Bang test

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Geneva, Sep 10: As soon as the project leader Lyn Evans gave a sign, first protons were fired into a 17-mile-long Large Hadron Collider at Swiss-French border on Wednesday, Sep 10 at 12:30 pm. Scientists hope it will provide the necessary power to smash the components of atoms so that they can see how Universe came into being 13.7 billion years ago.

People heaved a great sign of relief all over the world, as there was no little disruption reported from aynywhere. So, fear of black holes or end of universe remained just a fear. 'It's nonsense,'' said James Gillies, chief spokesman for CERN, the host European Organization for Nuclear Research.

Gillies told sources that the most dangerous thing that could happen would be if a beam at full power were to go out of control, and that would only damage the accelerator itself and burrow into the rock around the tunnel deep below the Swiss-French border. 

The project organized by the 20 European member nations of CERN has attracted researchers of 80 nationalities. While main investors were US and Japan, India did invest some $25 million and manpower into the experiment.  

The collider is designed to push the proton beam close to the speed of light, whizzing 11,000 times a second around the tunnel. The CERN experiments could reveal more about dark matter, the Higgs boson and eventually the matter which created Universe.

 

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