Inflation in Pak forcing Hindus to shun their customs and traditions

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Karachi, July 10 : The prevailing inflationary trend in Pakistan has hit the Hindus badly, as they have been forced to shun their customs and traditions at weddings and festivals.

Life for them has completely changed in less than two decades, when they used to have great fun on social functions like marriages or birth of young ones. But, now the skyrocketing prices have left them with no option but to curtail their celebrations, reported the Daily Times.

40-year-old Radha says when she got married 20 years ago, her parents gifted her 30 grams of gold, 80 dresses and other objects of daily need. But, now she couldn't give even a necklace to her daughter at her marriage.

Recalling her own marriage, she says, "It was a grand show. Everyone wore new clothes and turned up at the vast ground near Karachi university. There was dancing to folk songs and drums. But it seems that time has changed everything. Weddings are no longer a cause of happiness. They have become a burden for parents and relatives instead of a source of joy. Even the costumes have changed."

The traditional customs of the Hindus have changed entirely, as Radha adds: "The prices of daily commodities have risen so high that the residents can't even afford a meal a day. How can they then afford to spend on costumes and traditions? It was essential in my community to gift gold jewelry in a dowry but I could not afford this or bridal clothes for my daughters. My husband's lost his eyesight and no longer earns. I had to manage a very basic wedding."

Sainjhee, another resident, agrees that inflation has badly affected their culture and traditions. "Till a few years ago, we used to observe different cultural events with special costumes, including 'Kharoo Batlo' (Bitter Meal), 'Chhathi' (a ceremony to name a newborn), 'Gau Daan' (gifting a cow to the bride), 'Satawaro', 'Paath' and others. These are essential part of our community but you need money to keep these traditions alive. We have none," she says.

"These tradition were celebrated throughout the Waghari colony but, to tell you the truth, they have now been traded with 'Parshads' (offerings at a temple)," adds Sainjhee.

ANI

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