Marriage halls resent IPRS drive against illegal playing of music

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Chandigarh, Oct 25 (UNI) Marriage palaces, restaurant bar owners, shopkeepers, event managers and organisers of ceremonies may face the music for playing recorded music without obtaining permission from the ''owner of the musical work'', if Indian Performing Right Society (IPRS) has its way.

Representatives of IPRS, a registered ''non-profit-making organisation'', are reportedly visiting several cities across the region for detecting Copyright violations.

The drive has, however, evoked sharp reaction from round 2,400 members of Punjab Marriage Palaces and Resorts Association, who are unwilling to obtain IPRS permission for playing recorded music in their palaces or face action.

The IPRS, established in August, 1969, administers and controls performing rights of musical works on behalf of its members.

The organisation, with associates like Gulzar, Javed Akhtar, A R Rehman and Gurdas Mann, collects and distributes royalty among members, including authors, composers and publishers of music.

The IPRS officials are initiating action against those infringing the Copyright Act and it has been successful in getting court orders against many errant parties for depriving royalty to its members, an IPRS official told UNI.

Fee is collected from marriage places owners, event organisers, hotels, restaurants, shopping plazas, malls, discos, disc jockeys and clinics and nursing homes. Wedding receptions are also covered, he said.

The society has directed reciprocal agreements with countries like Australia, Malaysia, Indonesia, Hong Kong, the USA, the UK and South Africa and International music royalties are remitted through foreign counterparts.

Meanwhile, a delegation of marriage place owners of district Fatehgarh Sahib has submitted a memorandum to Fatehgarh Sahib Deputy Commissioner against the Society's drive here.

Spokesperson of the Association Gurminder Grewal said that IPRS officials have directed the marriage place owners to pay Rs 3,120 for every D J, Music Orchestra, cultural programme, if recorded music was played, or otherwise be prepared to face stringent action for Copyright violations.

He argued the fee should be charged from orchestra owners or other persons related to the performance but not from marriage palace owners.

Mr Grewal claimed that it was difficult for the marriage place owners to pay for every programme.

UNI

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